Guest Instructors

You are here: Home - Guest Instructors

  • Ben Fenske Portrait Concepts August 2017

    Alas, poor Yorick! I knew him, Horatio

     

    Just wrapped up another class with visiting artist Ben Fenske; a new, slightly different version of the portrait construction class he taught back in 2015 (click here to read about that course).

     

    Like Ben’s other courses, this was a mountain of information to get through in just a few days.  After lecturing extensively each day, Ben would demonstrate, and we had a variety of information for the students to draw and paint from.

     

     

    Below, a few of Ben’s demonstration boards from the class:

     

     

     

    On the last day, Ben gave a quick demo showing how he approaches using these construction concepts in paint.

     

     

     

    Here are a few images of the students at work during the class:

     

    Many thanks to our group of students, many of whom traveled to get here.  Until next time.

  • Ben Fenske Landscape Class August 2017

     

    We just finished another super informative landscape painting class with visiting artist and friend Ben Fenske.  It’s always great to have him here.  We had a really nice group of students, full class, and many of the students with lots of painting experience.  I think the group seemed very happy…  Besides the fact that all of Fenske’s courses are just dense with information, this time the weather was just fantastic.  Sunny all three days, with not too much humidity or heat (for a Boston summer).  There may have been a sunburn or two, but other than that, I think it all went off without a hitch.

     

     

    Like Ben’s last landscape course (click here to read about Ben’s landscape painting class in 2016), there were a large variety of demonstrations.  The first day, Ben spent a long time explaining his approach, and went to great effort to explain the importance of simplification in all aspects.  As you can see in the demo below, Fenske started with a review of tonal values, and a five value ‘tonal plan’ for his landscape: a simple, sensible way to hold onto the effect as it changes, and to not get lost in the accents and minutiae of nature as we observe it.

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Ben did other demos in the mornings of the second and third days, and was asked to focus particularly on how to achieve a strong start.  Above, Fenske showing how he would lay in and simplify the garden and sunflowers, and below, a morning sketch of a tractor.

     

     

     

    Each day after lunch we would meet in my studio for the afternoons.  Ben showed a few slides on the computer, and did a series of demos out of his head, based on light effects and times of day, color theory, atmospheric perspective, linear perspective, composition and more.  After that he would take questions from the class, and paint things after their suggestions for an hour or so.  It was a marathon.

     

     

    The above picture is just a nice picture, but the below picture has Fenske explaining a morning backlit effect on the right side of the canvas, and then a sunset effect on the other side.

     

     

     

     

    Above, a board from Ben’s talk on linear perspective and atmospheric perspective as it applies to clouds, and below, the afternoon group.

     

     

     

     

    And here are some nice images of the students at work during the class.  It was a lot of fun- many thanks to Ben for offering so much to our students.  Currently we have his portrait class going on in the studio- a blog post will be coming on that sometime next week.

     

     

     

     

  • Sergio Roffo Demo July 2017

     

    Last Saturday I was happy to host a demo for Sergio Roffo in the studio.  Although Roffo is one of the best known painters here in New England, particularly for his ambitious, color saturated coastal scenes and marine paintings, it was only the second time I had seen him in action.  It was a ton of fun.  He paints a great demo, is engaging with the audience, and I personally came away with the same thing as when we painted together last winter-  man, he works quickly and efficiently.

     

     

    As is somewhat standard for a two hour demo, Sergio started by describing his artistic background, how he organizes his palette and brushes, and how he lays out a painting.  For this demo, he brought in two images, a print of an older large landscape of his to use for color, design, and parts of the composition, and a second painting of a Herreshoff sailboat to insert into the painting.

     

     

    After laying in the composition in pencil, Sergio painted the sky to his satisfaction, and then painted in the rest of the landscape (from back to front, most distant water finally to the nearest dune).  Roffo nearly finishes as he goes, painting to high detail in a bright, luminescent fashion.  After a pass on each spot, he would return to it to revisit the coloring of an area, and describe surface texture with meticulous, calligraphic brush strokes.

    While painting the boat, Sergio not only described all of the boat’s anatomy, but spoke about the importance of having consistent wind marks running through your grass and sand to support the direction of the sailboat.  I believe Sergio said that the Herreshoff in his painting he wanted to appear traveling at about 15 knots.

     

     

    After just an hour and forty minutes or so, Sergio quickly grabbed his painting and went over to the adjacent table (and to audible gasps from the audience) framed the picture.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Huge thanks to Sergio Roffo for agreeing to come share his talents with us.   He has many distinctions, he is an elected Fellow of the the American Society of Marine Artists (ASMA), an Associate Living Master of the Art Renewal Center, and an elected member of the Guild of Boston Artists.

    You can visit Sergio’s website by clicking here.   He has a solo show opening at Quidley & Co’s Nantucket gallery on Friday August 18th, and if you click here you will be brought to Sergio’s page on their website.  

    Additionally, Roffo is taking part of a group show opening September 9th at Tree’s Place in Orleans, MA.  He will also do a demo the day of the opening, contact the gallery for seats.

    There will be another demo by Sergio at the Rockport Art Association in October, during the Cape Ann plein air festival.  Contact the Art Association for availability.

     

  • Marc Dalessio Stonington class July 2017

     

    Earlier this month, Marc Dalessio and I ran a marathon 5-day landscape painting workshop in Stonington, on Deer Isle, one of my favorite places to paint in Maine.  Everyone worked very hard, with some students painting for hours before and after class times each day.  It was a whirlwind week, and I believe everyone got a lot out of it, Marc and I included.

    Marc demonstrating his approach to students on the first day of class at Sand Beach.  Marc talked at length about using sight-size as an effective means to expedite drawing, adjust placement and scale on the canvas, and how he deals with compositional pitfalls as they present themselves throughout the process.

    Marc’s demo on the first morning was about two hours, while Marc’s wife Tina painted with their dog Emma, in the background.

     

    below, a few images of the students at work throughout the class:

    Paul Sullivan painting on West Main St

    Bob Sullivan painting from the corner of Andy’s Wharf looking towards Green Head

    Sandra Dolan painting the harbor from Church Street

     

    As is often the case in the northeast, the weather was unpredictable.  Our weather for the course ranged from high 80s with humidity to low 60’s and freezing a-la-San Francisco in August when the fog rolled in.  We had rain, fog, clear skies, puffy clouds, wind, and all that sometimes in the same day; as if traversing the seasons in real time.  It’s a lot of fun- but provides an extra logistical layer to a class like this.  Between the weather, tides rolling in and out, and light changing as usual, there are a ton of variables to deal with.  Our intrepid group of students put up with the fact that neither Marc nor I can control the weather, no matter the app on your phone (we discuss weather apps a lot, here’s a list of Marc’s favorites).

     

    marc and cooper happily working away in the rain 

     

    Stonington is such a fantastic place to paint. I invited along a couple of New-England hometown heroes who have been painting the area for decades, Stapleton Kearns and TM Nicholas.  Both did a lot of work during the week.  It was nice to have painters with their experience along, as it adds to the critical mass getting momentum in a class. The students can listen to what Marc or I have to say, and then see entirely ‘similar but different’ approaches on the canvases of others.  I think that’s quite valuable. Additionally, the entire academic method that Marc and I were taught in (by Charles Cecil and Daniel Graves, respectively) came through the studio of RH Ives Gammell, who was Stapleton’s teacher in the 1970s.  Through that common background, we were able to talk a bit about the concept of artistic lineage and heritage as it applies to both 19th-20th century academic painting and american impressionism.

     

    TM Nicholas (not pictured), my easel, Meghan Weeks, Stape Kearns, Marc and Tina Dalessio all painting in the fog after class

    Stape, Marc and TM chatting on Church Street in the afternoon.

     

    The one day that rain got real heavy, Stapleton kindly offered to do an indoor demonstration.  An indoor demo during the rain is a total lifesaver for the morale of the class, and Stape does a great one.  He paints entirely out of his head, without reference, and it is always a seascape- not a landscape of the sea, but a big ‘crashing wave’ picture that really couldn’t be done from life.  Towards the end of the demo, Stape, Marc and I all started telling stories a bit, again reinforcing the common themes in what we do, and how we were trained.

     

    Stape’s demo, above (though I would wager he’s kept working on it since)

     

    One of the novel aspects of these classes is that they are like little engineering summits for outdoor painters.  Painting outside has become so popular that there are tons of products on the market.  That said, nearly everyone I know uses a unique system, often that they rig up to some degree themselves.  Dalessio was showing off the brand-spanking-new version of his Carbon Fiber homemade ultra-super-light system, I was showing everyone the Viktor Butko rack system in my car for traveling with big paintings. I also spent time plugging the new painting boxes from Mosepi (which are really very similar to the cigar boxes that my friends and I used to paint with, I like them very much), they work well for what we do.  Cooper Dragonette showed everyone his homemade kit which was very fancy, Stapleton Kearns showed the class the many virtues of the Gloucester easel (recommending exclusively the Stapleton Kearns model by take-it easel, of course). We even had an real honest-to-goodness well trained furniture maker in the class that made a homemade box and panel carrier system that literally brought gasps to viewers (peter, you should sell those).

     

    On the last day of class, Marc gave a demonstration specifically on using indirect painting techniques to strengthen your landscapes: glazing, scumbling, and talked extensively about scraping down and controlling your surface.  Marc uses these tools to strengthen effects of atmospheric perspective, or to add fog and cloud cover, and perhaps most useful, simply correcting areas of color without losing your hard work underneath.

     

     

    Many thanks to Marc and all of our students for coming up to Deer Isle to paint for the week.  For 2018, Dalessio and I have begun planning a course in Italy.  If you would like first crack at such an opportunity, sign up for the mailing list at the top of the classes tab.

     

     

     

     

  • Mario Robinson Demonstration, October 2016

    dsc_0569img_9449

    This past weekend Mario Andres Robinson came up to Boston to share a bit of what he does with us in the studio.  For those unfamiliar with his work, Mario is one of very few American artists holding to a tradition of high-finish, realist watercolor.  He also paints in pastel and oil, and now is a published author.

    I’ve known of his work for over a decade, as we came up in a common gallery (Ann Long Fine Art) I was able to see many of his watercolors, pastels and graphite drawings years ago- though we hadn’t met til this past weekend.  Mario is a generous, open artist, and it was a lot of fun speaking with him and sharing the studio for a few days.

     

    During the demo I took a few snapshots of his process, below, a few of the steps that Mario’s demo went through:

    img_9445

    img_9451

    img_9454

     

    dsc_0571

     

    Many artists (cough cough *me*) find watercolor frustrating and mystifying.  Watching Mario paint on Sunday through the early afternoon, I was struck by how similar his approach was in many respects to the techniques that I use in indirect oil painting- he starts off with a line drawing to allow him to paint more freely through the session, and layers his work with an attention to tonal relationships that really are near analogue to my oil underpainting process.  Of course, watercolor moves differently, dries a different color, and is affected by gravity- lots to think about.

    I wholeheartedly recommend his book, it’s all explained in better detail there.

     

    dsc_0569

    click here for an Amazon link to Mario’s new Book, Lessons in Realistic Watercolor

     

  • Ben Fenske Landscape Class August 2016

    Last weekend was our summer guest landscape course taught by Ben Fenske.  The last courses that Ben had taught through my studio were centered on structural concepts in figure and portrait drawing (click here to read about his last class).  Like his approach to the human form, Fenske’s method of teaching Landscape Painting is based on structure, theory, and preconceived tonal hierarchies to have in mind.  Through rigorous study and thorough understanding one can achieve free, fluid painting.

     

    DSC_0295

     

    Like always, our landscape class was at the whim of the weather, and the forecast was somewhat grim.  We completely lucked out, though from one day to the next we had somewhat drastic changes in light- the first day was overcast, quite cold and humid like a fall morning, and by the second day we were in the high 90’s, a total scorcher. Luckily, our hosts have a beautiful farm with plenty of shade and all sorts of animals to keep us entertained.

     

    DSC_0301

    Laying in the scene as a linear drawing

     

    Ben Fenske did a series of demonstrations throughout the class- on the first day, he talked through first setting up your scene as a linear drawing- designing each shape, carefully measuring the proportions to make sure to have not only accuracy, but a pleasing sense of scale on the canvas, and then checking each of your objects in linear perspective.  Ben explained that the more confident one is in their drawing’s accuracy, the more free and interpretive they can be with their painting.  He also took some time to do a simple 6-value representation of the scene, to set up the tonal hierarchy that he would use to paint that light effect. Unfortunately I don’t have an image of his large demo after the first day. •edit 8/23/16 thanks to student Mike Rohner for sending me the below image-demo at the end of Ben’s first session.

     

    IMG_0738

    Surprising no one (this is New England after all), by the second day the weather had entirely shifted, and we had a sunny, hot morning.  Rather than starting over, Ben decided to talk everyone through how he would go about changing his grey day picture to a sunny effect, scrambling to change the color/tonal structure of the painting.  One of the students mentioned that this was particularly helpful, to watch how quickly the decision making process had to happen, and that he clearly had a mental image of what he wanted it to look like before he put the changes to the canvas.  Fenske also talked at length about how to keep your painting ‘open’, to not lose freshness and how to delicately balance in the painterly space between unity and variety, and in his words ‘to keep a lively surface’.

     

    Ben Demoing

     

    Below is Fenske’s demo after the second day, having rapidly changed his painting from an overcast effect, to a backlit sunny day.

     

    bendemofinal

    finished demo, sunlit effect ~24×28″ 60x70cm

     

    Ben then spent the rest of each day critiquing the students working on their individual paintings, here are some images:

    Fenske Carmody

    Meghan

    DSC_0365

    DSC_0372

    DSC_0359

    ben and mike

    DSC_0416

    ben and hal

     

     

    On the last day of the class Fenske gave a different demonstration, during which he did not paint from a scene in front of him, but painted instead a series of small scenes from imagination.  During the first demo (top right on the below canvas) he first went through describing the division of structural planes in the landscape, whether a building, tree, cloud or road.  Then, after setting up the painting he was able to demonstrate how color and tonal modulations, however slight, can give the effect of depth in your canvas.  I have seen Ben give versions of this demo over the years, and I would rank the talk he gave on the last day as one of his best.

     

    DSC_0387

    Ben Fenske explaining two separate techniques for controlling and modulating greens

     

    bendemo2

    Ben’s initial demo, top right was about color value divisions in the landscape.  Same scene, top left moonlit effect and bottom right “golden hour” effect, with a dark post storm sky

    Our visiting artist continued to paint for much of the morning.  After doing a small talk on application techniques, Ben spoke about at length about controlling your painting’s surface and a variety of different techniques to achieve color vibration.  I agreed with Ben when he said that color vibration is a huge part of painting that is now rarely talked about.  Not only did Ben give effective examples for keeping color vibration, he showed how one would lose color vibration as well, showing us how one might kill an area, create a dead spot in the painting.

     

    DSC_0424

    Ben continued paint different effects of the same view, showing how the same 6-color approach could represent any number of different atmospheric light effects, times of day and moods.  In my opinion, this was a particularly instructive part of the class for the students, I got the feeling they would have been content to have Ben continue to paint out of his head for the rest of the day…. and Ben nearly did.

    bendemo3

    Clockwise from top right: Front-Lit Sunlit effect, Backlit ‘Silouhette’ effect, overcast ‘Grey Day’ effect (with added reds to liven up the view) and Sunset effect (which he started adding a body of water to)

    Ben Gray Demo

    Fenske’s initial 6-color black and white representation of the grey day effect, from the first day

     

     

    And here’s a few of our friends from the class:

    DSC_0333

    Pigs

    DSC_0348

     

     

    Ben’s suggested Reading List for this Class:

    John Carlson’s Guide to Landscape Painting, amazon link to the most inexpensive and complete text on landscape painting 

    The Art of Landscape Painting in Oil Color by Sir Alfred East, the book that Edward Seago would reference that Ben and I mentioned

    Birge Harrison, Landscape Painting (this edition includes Asher Durand’s text on the landscape which admittedly I have not read-leo)

    a few artist’s monographs:

    Arthur Streeton 1867-1943 by Geoffrey Smith (other monographs on Streeton are great too, but this happens to be the one I have in the studio)

    Isaac Levitan: Lyrical Landscape 

    Hidden Treasures: Russian and Soviet Impressionism 1930-1970s

    Edward Seago (price has been rising on this monograph, but still reasonable)

    Soviet Impressionist Painting by Vern Swanson

    Masters of Russian impressionism: Sergei Petrovich Tkachev & Aleksei Petrovich Tkachev

  • Adrian Gottlieb Class, July 2016

    DSC_0201

     

    I had the pleasure of sharing my studio at the end of last month with an old friend from our Florence Academy days, Adrian Gottlieb.  Though Adrian and I hadn’t gotten together since somewhere around 2002, over the years we’ve kept in touch over the internet, and I was very happy to have the chance to get us together again for a 5 day portrait painting intensive at my studio.  Additionally, we went and painted copies together at the MFA, and had some fantastic meals together.

     

    DSC_0209

     

    DSC_0222

     

    Starting the first morning, Adrian gave an extended talk and demo, running through comparative proportional measurement tools, 3D structural plane concepts (Ben Fenske’s sculpted planes of the head models came in very handy), and a thorough talk on the materials list.  As far as it pertains to demonstrations,  the studios in Italy that Adrian and I trained at do hardly any teaching through demonstration, rather pure theory and discussion on the students’ individual paintings.  Here in the states, there tends to be a large amount of requested demonstration in workshops, and often the demonstration is a central portion of the class: there’s just less time to impart information from an instructor in a few days than there is in 3 years.  This leaves students hungry to get an overview of each artist’s process, and a demo may be the fastest way to achieve that.   As I’ve become accustomed to the demo-centric model I’ve really come to appreciate instructors who during their demonstrations paint slowly and deliberately, as they would in their own studio, rather than rushing through the steps in a slapdash manner, a sort of performance art that may be entertaining to watch but may often be a less-than-solid example.

    Gottlieb is a very thorough instructor, each morning he took time going through not only what he was doing in his demonstration, but also why he would go through each step, down to changing mediums for different layers of the painting, and a bit on paint rheology.  Adrian and I did a bit of back and forth during the class on materials (both of us were resident materials geeks at The Florence Academy during our respective times there).  Personally, it’s nice having someone around that I can get lost in a discussion about the advantages of one oil over another.

    Here are a few progress shots I took of Adrian’s demo over the course of the week:

    Demo-beg

    Demo-middle2

    demo3

    Angiesmall

     

    Also, a not-so-secret part of me running these guest workshops out of my studio is to bring people to the Boston area that have a style or aesthetic that is parallel but markedly different than my own; to give people a chance that study here with me to hear the perhaps same things I am talking about when teaching, but from a slightly different perspective. Same prism, but through a different facet.   Gottlieb’s class has been a great example of that.  Adrian works up very finely painted, subtle heads, far more refined than my more blocky, broken brush approach, but through the class I overheard him telling my weekly students the exact same working methods and ways to streamline their process than I teach, whether it applied to drawing, tonal comparison, or simple color mixing.  When those things echo through the studio it makes running these workshops and demos very gratifying.

     

    Here are a few more photos from the course- Adrian should be back again to teach out of my studio in 2017, so sign up for the mailing list if you want a spot in that class.

     

    DSC_0248

    DSC_0242

    DSC_0244

    DSC_0260

    DSC_0264

    DSC_0253

    DSC_0247

     

    Here are some shopping links that came up during the class:

    A link to Adrian’s new favorite arm palette, the portrait society’s John Sargent replica palette

    Here is an Amazon link to one of the plaster planes of the head casts we used during the class

    Here is another Amazon link of planar features, based on Michelangelo’s David

    This is a link to John Asaro’s planes of the head, one of Adrian’s preferred structural teaching examples (N.B., original head only)

    This is a link to Solomon J Solomon’s Practice of Painting and Drawing

    Another book link, Harold Speed’s Oil Painting Techniques

     

  • Teresa Oaxaca Class June 2016

     

    End of June was Teresa Oaxaca’s second class in the studio, click here to read a blog post on her class last year.  

    DSC_0137

     

    Last year’s course at my studio was a portrait drawing class, this time, one-shot portrait painting.  We had a great group, and many returning students from 2015’s class.  The group seemed very happy, Teresa runs her class with a lot of good energy, she’s as passionate about painting as she is talented.

     

     

    IMG_7377

    DSC_0121

     

    Oaxaca demonstrated at length, and worked with everyone individually as they worked up their ~6 hour paintings. The students did well, and I think overall showed quite a bit of improvement.  I spent some time sketching with the group which was a lot of fun.

     

    DSC_0140

    DSC_0141

     

    It seems like every workshop something fun food related happens, this time was no exception- this time, student Jay Wee (pictured above with Teresa) brought a big bag of Island Creek oysters up from Duxbury, which I opened for everyone at lunch over the weekend.  Definitely an extra perk, who else runs art workshops with a raw bar at lunch?  huge shoutout to Jay 😉

     

    IMG_7383

     

    Extracurricular activities brought Teresa another commission while she was in Boston, and a bit of time drawing with my son in the evening while waiting for me to get the grill going.  Look forward to the next time Teresa will come teach, she is off to Europe for the summer.   Image of her portrait commission below:

     

    javioaxaca

     

     

     

     

Back to top